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Not photoshopped. This pic was snapped by Igor Podgorny after a fire decimated parts of Linevo village in the Volgograd Region of Russia. More about the fire:

Linevo village in Volgograd Region of Russia has become a new victim of fire. About 80 houses were demolished. They spoke about various causes of the fire: strong wind, break of wire or short circuit, even an arson commited by Chechens… But nobody told about the real reason: the houses burnt because someone just set fire to dry grass on the outskirts as it usually happens everywhere…

[via Gizmodo via English Russia]

Фото: © Игорь Подгорный

Ah, the old “planting a fake bag of cocaine on a stressed traveler” trick—a classic!
From Gizmodo’s article on a TSA employee pranking travelers.

I hate popcorn. Yes, I hate the taste but the smell is pretty good. I do like watching it pop at 62,000 frames a second.

[Gizmodo via Eater]

Get outta the way! Maybe, the real reason for the delayed launch of STS-133 is this satellite taking these great photos of the launchpad. About the launch:

The Space Shuttle Discovery waits on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its final trip into space in this image captured by the GeoEye-1 satellite yesterday. The launch will mark Discovery’s 39th journey, and NASA’s 133rd shuttle mission overall. One final space shuttle launch is scheduled for Feb. 27, 2011, before NASA retires the shuttle fleet for good.

[Gizmodo via Wired]

Get outta the way! Maybe, the real reason for the delayed launch of STS-133 is this satellite taking these great photos of the launchpad. About the launch:

The Space Shuttle Discovery waits on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its final trip into space in this image captured by the GeoEye-1 satellite yesterday. The launch will mark Discovery’s 39th journey, and NASA’s 133rd shuttle mission overall. One final space shuttle launch is scheduled for Feb. 27, 2011, before NASA retires the shuttle fleet for good.

[Gizmodo via Wired]

Holding An Exploded Water Balloon.

Edward Horsford has taken a series of high-speed pictures that captures a water balloon…without the balloon. The shots are snapped at the point of explosion, when the balloon skin breaks open. It looks like he’s somehow holding a ball of water.

[Gizmodo via Edward Horsford via NPR via Neatorama]

Holding An Exploded Water Balloon.

Edward Horsford has taken a series of high-speed pictures that captures a water balloon…without the balloon. The shots are snapped at the point of explosion, when the balloon skin breaks open. It looks like he’s somehow holding a ball of water.

[Gizmodo via Edward Horsford via NPR via Neatorama]

Leaked Images of Discovery Tank Cracks Confirmed. Today, NASA has confirmed the news:

This morning during removal of external fuel tank foam insulation, which cracked during draining operations following the shuttle Discovery’s launch scrub on Nov. 5., technicians identified two cracks on a section of the tank’s metal exterior. They were found on the stringer, which is the composite aluminum ring located on the top of the tank’s intertank area. The cracks are approximately 9 inches long. Engineers are reviewing images of the cracks to determine the best possible repair method, which would be done at Launch Pad 39A.
Crews have repaired similar cracks during external tank production by removing the cracked aluminum and replacing it with a “doubler,” which is a twice-as-thick stringer section before replacing the foam insulation.
Exact schedules and repair options still are being evaluated.


Ouch. This really blows. Hope they can resolve this quickly.
[Gizmodo via NASA]

Leaked Images of Discovery Tank Cracks Confirmed. Today, NASA has confirmed the news:

This morning during removal of external fuel tank foam insulation, which cracked during draining operations following the shuttle Discovery’s launch scrub on Nov. 5., technicians identified two cracks on a section of the tank’s metal exterior. They were found on the stringer, which is the composite aluminum ring located on the top of the tank’s intertank area. The cracks are approximately 9 inches long. Engineers are reviewing images of the cracks to determine the best possible repair method, which would be done at Launch Pad 39A.

Crews have repaired similar cracks during external tank production by removing the cracked aluminum and replacing it with a “doubler,” which is a twice-as-thick stringer section before replacing the foam insulation.

Exact schedules and repair options still are being evaluated.

Ouch. This really blows. Hope they can resolve this quickly.

[Gizmodo via NASA]

City of Skulls.

This is Cherepovets. And those are not nuclear weapons exploding in the horizon, but massive smoke columns from the factories that saturate this Russian city, one of the most polluted in the world. And I thought LA’s smog was bad.
The name of the city—located near the Sheksna River—basically means city of skulls. Looking at the sky, it seems like a perfect a name to me.


[Gizmodo via Elena Chinarina via DRB]

City of Skulls.

This is Cherepovets. And those are not nuclear weapons exploding in the horizon, but massive smoke columns from the factories that saturate this Russian city, one of the most polluted in the world. And I thought LA’s smog was bad.

The name of the city—located near the Sheksna River—basically means city of skulls. Looking at the sky, it seems like a perfect a name to me.

[Gizmodo via Elena Chinarina via DRB]

Burj Khalifa. A photo from the Gizmodo freelensing shooting challenge (unfortunately not the winner). Photog, Ian Doss, on the photo:

I am currently working in Dubai and had the opportunity to visit the terrace on the 112th floor of the Burj Khalifa, snapped this while up there…holding my lens very tightly for fear i might drop it a few thousand feet. 5D MKII, 24-70mm L at roughly 50mm, ISO: 100, Shutter: 1/1000

See the rest on flickr.
[Gizmodo]

Burj Khalifa. A photo from the Gizmodo freelensing shooting challenge (unfortunately not the winner). Photog, Ian Doss, on the photo:

I am currently working in Dubai and had the opportunity to visit the terrace on the 112th floor of the Burj Khalifa, snapped this while up there…holding my lens very tightly for fear i might drop it a few thousand feet. 5D MKII, 24-70mm L at roughly 50mm, ISO: 100, Shutter: 1/1000

See the rest on flickr.

[Gizmodo]

Spaghetti train tracks. Hope this doesn’t happen here in Tokyo when I’m on the train! From the post:

This ain’t a photochop, we promise. This past September, a quake rocked Canterbury, New Zealand. But rather than scenes of destruction and rubble, the tremors left behind some bizarre scenes—like these warped tracks atop pristine countryside.

[Gizmodo via AGU via Reddit]

Spaghetti train tracks. Hope this doesn’t happen here in Tokyo when I’m on the train! From the post:

This ain’t a photochop, we promise. This past September, a quake rocked Canterbury, New Zealand. But rather than scenes of destruction and rubble, the tremors left behind some bizarre scenes—like these warped tracks atop pristine countryside.

[Gizmodo via AGU via Reddit]

You Know When You’re Biking and You Hit That Wall?

That may or may not what this bike shop in Altlandsberg, Germany had in mind when they decided to put up 120 old bikes instead of a sign. I’ll take that red one by the vine, please.

[Gizmodo via Flavorwire via Notcot]

You Know When You’re Biking and You Hit That Wall?

That may or may not what this bike shop in Altlandsberg, Germany had in mind when they decided to put up 120 old bikes instead of a sign. I’ll take that red one by the vine, please.

[Gizmodo via Flavorwire via Notcot]

The Rest of the Numbered Pencil Family.

We all know and love the No. 2 Pencil, but what about Messrs. No. 1 - No. 12? Artist Nathan W. Pyle has dutifully cataloged those lesser-known writing implements, which you can buy as a t-shirt on Woot.

[Gizmodo via Laughing Squid]

The Rest of the Numbered Pencil Family.

We all know and love the No. 2 Pencil, but what about Messrs. No. 1 - No. 12? Artist Nathan W. Pyle has dutifully cataloged those lesser-known writing implements, which you can buy as a t-shirt on Woot.

[Gizmodo via Laughing Squid]

This Is Why We Need Astronauts. From the post:

But I’m not going to repeat again what Neil Armstrong and 26 other NASA legends already said. And I’m not going to rehash why we need to reach the stars physically, not only virtually. Or describe why Carl Sagan said in The Pale Blue Dot that our destiny is to become wanderers of the cosmos.
I think the image above is a perfect summary of it all.

Indeed.
[Gizmodo, Original image by Stuart Atkinson]

This Is Why We Need Astronauts. From the post:

But I’m not going to repeat again what Neil Armstrong and 26 other NASA legends already said. And I’m not going to rehash why we need to reach the stars physically, not only virtually. Or describe why Carl Sagan said in The Pale Blue Dot that our destiny is to become wanderers of the cosmos.

I think the image above is a perfect summary of it all.

Indeed.

[Gizmodo, Original image by Stuart Atkinson]

This May Very Well Be the First New Earth. From Gizmodo:

You are looking at what could be the fourth planet on the Gliese 581 star system, 20.3 light years from Earth. If the NASA artist rendition looks very much like our Earth… it’s because it is similar to Earth.
Gliese 581 is a red dwarf star. A starship traveling at near the speed of light would only take 20.3 years to get there, which is not that much. Until now, astronomers had discovered five planets around this star. Some of them were too close to it, making them too hot to be habitable. Others were too far and too cold. But now, a sixth planet has been discovered right on the “habitable zone”, the fourth in distance from the star: Gliese 581g.
If the discoveries from the planet hunters at University of California Santa Cruz and the Carnegie Institution of Washington are right, Gliese 581g could be habitable.


[Gizmodo via NASA]

This May Very Well Be the First New Earth. From Gizmodo:

You are looking at what could be the fourth planet on the Gliese 581 star system, 20.3 light years from Earth. If the NASA artist rendition looks very much like our Earth… it’s because it is similar to Earth.

Gliese 581 is a red dwarf star. A starship traveling at near the speed of light would only take 20.3 years to get there, which is not that much. Until now, astronomers had discovered five planets around this star. Some of them were too close to it, making them too hot to be habitable. Others were too far and too cold. But now, a sixth planet has been discovered right on the “habitable zone”, the fourth in distance from the star: Gliese 581g.

If the discoveries from the planet hunters at University of California Santa Cruz and the Carnegie Institution of Washington are right, Gliese 581g could be habitable.

[Gizmodo via NASA]

Data Visualization, Visualized. How very meta. From Gizmodo:

We love nice charts and data visualization. That’s why we like this meta-chart: Data visualization, visualized. Design, user interface, information, data journalism, communication and visual communication, merging.

[Gizmodo via Ffunction]

Data Visualization, Visualized. How very meta. From Gizmodo:

We love nice charts and data visualization. That’s why we like this meta-chart: Data visualization, visualized. Design, user interface, information, data journalism, communication and visual communication, merging.

[Gizmodo via Ffunction]